Tough as Steel: Brendan Fowler

Brendan Fowler currently plays professional lacrosse for the New York Lizards, a team in Major League Lacrosse and for the Vancouver Stealth, a team in the National Lacrosse League.

His story starts far before he landed in the professional ranks though, his college career began as he walked-on to both the Duke football and lacrosse teams, the result of hard work and mental toughness he put in while growing up.

Fowler took the TAP assessment awhile back and discovered he was a Rocket Athlete.

Read more to find out how the Rocket athlete type fits Fowler, and how effective and accurate he believes the TAP results are:


Brendan Fowler is a two-time NCAA Champion from his days of playing lacrosse at Duke, the NCAA Championship most outstanding player in 2013, and the single-season leader all-time in faceoffs won with his 399 in 2013.

Also a part of the football team during his time at Duke, Fowler was a part of the Blue Devils squad that made its first bowl since 1994– ending a nearly 20-year-old drought.

“At Duke I played football and lacrosse, which was hard. You come in as a walk on guy and you are definitely below the scholarship players, so it was a year and a half of hard work, extra runs, you have to prove yourself.”

The Duke athletics website credits Fowler with three solo tackles in his football career at Duke, but praises his leadership and work ethic he displayed while on the football team hailing him as someone who, “possesses outstanding work ethic and team-first mentality,” something rare to find in a player who doesn’t see in-game action often.

It’s no fluke that Fowler would be putting in this all-out effort for the football team, because as a Rocket athlete, he’s attracted to competitive situations and keeps a positive perspective. It’s important to have players like that on any team. Guys who, regardless of playing time, are going to bring their all to every practice and game rep they are given, even if it’s solely for the purpose of keeping the starting players on their A-game.

I do pride myself on mental toughness, which has been an edge for me over a lot of guys because I never thought I was the most gifted guy physically but I thought I had a mental edge over a lot of people,” Fowler said.

While his mental toughness was a key on the football fields during his time at Duke, they especially showed when he was excelling on the lacrosse field.

The face-off specialist is the perfect role for a Rocket to play in lacrosse– the thrill of winning is important to Rockets, and being a face-off man allows them to win against an opponent individually while also helping their team gain possession of the ball.

Not only that, but being a face-off man, you can’t be intimidated by an opponent, something that Rockets seldom ever do. This attitude allowed Fowler to become one of the prominent face-off specialists in NCAA history, even if he wasn’t as athletic as some of his opponents.

“If you ever asked anyone, I don’t think they would say Brendan Fowler is super-gifted – not that I wasn’t athletic – but for certain wasn’t the fastest on the teams I played on. I just think the mental edge always helped me work a little harder, put in a little more.”

Scoring a 99 on the Mental Toughness aspect of the TAP assessment is no ordinary feat, and speaks to the impressive nature of Brendan Fowler’s mental make-up.

Calm. Confident. Bold. These are the three key words used to describe a Rocket Athlete, people like Tom Brady, Buster Posey, and Lauren Chamberlain. All traits that players and coaches who have gone against Fowler can attest to him possessing:

While I was coaching at the University of Virginia we could never get a win vs. Duke. A lot of that had to do with Brendan refusing to lose—especially in the 4th quarter. He’d run off ten straight face-off wins to finish tight games. He’s tough as nails, and his off-the-chart TAP results are no surprise,” said Tim McDermott, currently an assistant coach at the University of Utah.

Mental toughness has always been a strength for Brendan Fowler, but it’s something he knows you have to work on continuously, “Mental toughness is something that you always need to work on and stay on top of. Whether you are the toughest guy on the team or the least toughest, you can definitely grow and get better from where you are at currently. But you need to be open. The only way you can grow mentally is to push yourself outside your comfort zone,” Fowler said.

2018-03-13T16:54:35+00:00 Athlete, Coaches, College, Lacrosse, Professional|